The Boeing 727 Lives On In Mexico – AirlineGeeks.com

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The Boeing 727 Lives On In Mexico

The Boeing 727 has a long history in Mexico, and the iconic Trijet can still be seen after more than 55 years of operations. With less than 50 of the 1832 B727s built still in service, Mexico is one of the few places where you can still see one fly.

The first Boeing 727 in Mexico belonged to Mexicana. It took delivery of its first aircraft back in 1966, only a couple of years after the type first entered service in 1964. Mexico’s oldest airline operated almost 70 of the type in total before phasing them out by 2003. This was the largest B727 fleet outside of the USA. Unfortunately, the Mexican carrier ceased operations in 2010.

The Mexican Government also made good use of the type. A 727 was used as the presidential aircraft for several years from 1979 before being replaced by a Boeing 757. A further six were utilized by the Mexican Air Force until 2019 and the Mexican Police are still operating them with three based out of Mexico City.

In December 2021 they could still be seen operating regular flights in their distinctive grey color schemes. All three of them just turned 40 years old having originally been delivered to Mexicana in 1981 and are registered XC-MPF, XC-NPF, XC-OPF.

Other airlines that operated the Boeing 727 in Mexico include Taesa, Allegro Air, Aerolineas Internacionales, Aeroejecutivo, Aeroexo and Aviacsa.

Two Boeing 727s sitting on the ground in Mexico City. (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Mark Evans)

Not Inflight, But Still In Use

In addition to the three still in service, at least a further 19 Boeing 727s can be seen parked around the country. Many of them have been left derelict for years but fortunately a few have been preserved including two former Air Force aircraft.

3503 is parked at Town Center Shopping Mall in Zumpango, not far from its former home of Santa Lucia Air Base which is now being converted into Mexico City’s new international airport.

3504 has been converted into an amusement park called Tematico Tizatlan park in Tlaxcala on the outskirts of Mexico City.

The view of 3504, a former Mexican Air Force Boeing 727, that has since been used as part of an amusement park. (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Mark Evans)

XC-FPA, a former Mexican Police aircraft now resides in Parque Tangamanga 1, San Luis Potosi.

XA-HOV is used as a training aircraft at IPN-ESIME Ticoman Aeronautica Engineering University in Mexico City.

XA-AAD is also used as a training aircraft at CONALEP Aeronáutico near Queretaro airport.

XA-MEE is now a paintball target at El Portal Gotcha near Monterrey North airport.

XA-SKC is preserved just outside the airport perimeter at Cuernavaca. It sits inside a small compound painted in Aeromexico colors and fake registration XA-LSV.

XA-RRA is preserved at Parque Metropolitano de Leon. It has been painted in its former Mexicana colors with fake registration XA-SEM.

The rest of them can all be seen derelict at the various airports.

Mexico City

•  XA-MEI

•  XA-UIJ

•  XA-ASS

•  XA-SXZ

Toluca

•  XA-RRB

•  XA-SQO

Cuernavaca

•  XA-UII

•  XA-SNW

Cancun

•  XA-TLZ

•  XA-RXI

Chichen Itza

•  XA-AAQ

  • Mark has been interested in aviation since the age of eight when he first went plane spotting at Manchester Airport, England. Trips around various European airports in the following years and then to the USA as a teenager furthered his desire.
    This led to Mark wanting to work in the industry and at the age of twenty one was accepted to train as an Air Traffic Controller. After training and working for several years in England, Mark moved to Bahrain in the Middle East where he worked for six years. He then moved to Sydney, Australia where he resides today after twenty years in the profession.
    Mark’s pursuit to see planes has seen him visit over 140 countries and territories, including places, like North Korea, Sudan and Iran. He has flown over 1,100 times, visited over 700 airports and can always be found researching his next trip.

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